Sitting for excessive periods causes health issues

Posted on 17 October 2012 by editor

A recent study of 800,000 people by Loughborough University has revealed that sitting for excessively long periods increases the risk of diabetes, heart disease and death. Even those who regularly exercise are also at risk.

David Vidgen, a personal trainer in Solihull and Birmingham at uniquephysiquefit.com said: “The real cause lies with our sedentary lifestyles, caused by watching Satellite TV, driving, or sitting in front of a computer. Even though many people in society own gym memberships, the amount of physical exercises undertaken is far too low.”

Diabetes UK reported that anyone who spent a lot of time sitting or lying down would “obviously benefit” from moving more.

Dr Emma Wilmot from the Diabetes Group at the University of Leicester, says while going to the gym or pool after work is better than heading straight for the sofa, spending a long time sitting down remains bad for you.

The university undertook several studies using different measurements – e.g, more or less than 14 hours a week watching TV, or self-reported sitting time of less than three hours a day to more than eight. The report could not specify just how much time sitting is bad for you.

Prof Stuart Biddle,Loughborough University said: “If a worker sits at their desk all day then goes to the gym, while their colleague heads home to watch TV, then the gym-goer will have better health outcomes. But there is still a health risk because of the amount of sitting they do. Comparatively, the risk for a waiter who is on their feet all day is going to be a lot lower.”

He added: “People convince themselves they are living a healthy lifestyle, doing their 30 minutes of exercise a day. But they need to think about the other 23.5 hours.”

What is clear from the report is that people should not be discouraged from exercising.  Individuals should aim to undertaken at least 2-3 hours of aerobic exercise per week.

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